September 30, 2008

Hiring The Right Medical Expert Witness Part 2

Hiring the right medical expert witness will provide proof and testimony in court to support your case. In Tips For Selecting The Right Expert Witness Service (Skynewswire.com), Rosie Fletcher writes:

Even if you don't need to hire the right expert witness service now, you could need one later so its better to be prepared in advance. The expect witness service you'll avail of must meet the following criteria:

3. Achievements and Credentials

Although titles don't define a person, they do carry significant weight in the court room. Consider this: if a jury is debating on the quality of education being provided by a certain school, that type of expert witness will they be more inclined to believe one who has sufficient experience in teaching and have a long list of professional credits and certification to his name or one who has simply had the benefit of graduating from high school? It may not be fair but that's how the world or more specifically, the law works. Knowing this, why hire one who doesn't have enough credentials when you can hire an expert witness that has them?

4. Degree of Involvement in an Industry

If you are looking for an expert witness to help you win a dispute over a real estate property, you will do better if you hire an expert witness who happens to work in the real estate industry as well. Being an active member of the industry helps the expert witness become a better judge and adviser. The expert witness doesn't rely on his observations and analytic skills alone to render a judgment; his actual work experience helps him greatly as well in coming up with valid and accurate results.

September 29, 2008

Terrorism Expert Witness On Planned Fort Dix Attack

Jury selection begins today in the trial of five foreign-born Muslims from the Philadelphia area charged with planning a jihad-inspired attack on the Fort Dix military base. Trading Markets.com reports:

The government's case is built primarily around secretly recorded conversations made by two cooperating witnesses who befriended the defendants. Those conversations, prosecutors say, detail "plans to attack Fort Dix and kill American soldiers" and include "discussions of the supposed justifications for such attacks rooted in radical jihadist ideology."

But defense attorneys contend their clients talked a bigger game than they intended to play, portraying them as easily manipulated individuals led into a plot by paid FBI informants who created a conspiracy out of hollow words and empty threats. "Any conspiracy that plots death and destruction has to be taken seriously," said Bruce Hoffman, a terrorism expert who teaches at Georgetown University and who is following the trial of the so-called Fort Dix Five.


Expert witness Hoffman said that there are no stereotypical "homegrown" terrorists and that each case has to be evaluated on its own.

September 27, 2008

Hiring the Right Medical Expert Witness

Hiring the right medical expert witness will provide proof and testimony in court to support your case. In Tips For Selecting The Right Expert Witness Service (Skynewswire.com), Rosie Fletcher writes:

Living in a litigious society has made many of us think of court settlement as our first rather than the last resort. Whenever a problem arises and ends up in a dispute, most of us prefer to have our dispute legally settled.

Thus, theres always a chance that youll need the services of an expert witness at some point in your life. Hiring an expert witness can solidify your case against the other party; if you hire the right expert witness service, the company will able to provide more than adequate proof and reliable testimony in court to support your claim.

Even if you don't need to hire the right expert witness service now, you could need one later so its better to be prepared in advance. The expect witness service you'll avail of must meet the following criteria:

1. Adequate Courtship Experience
You can't hire a novice to act as your expert witness. Court room battles are vicious and if the expert witness doesnt have any experience in providing testimonies, his claims will be shredded to bits even if he's telling the truth. An experienced expert witness knows on the other hand how to handle himself in court and modify his behavior and speech depending on the type of lawyer or judge whos questioning him. An experienced expert witness knows when to act calm or passionate and above all, how to be utterly convincing.

2. Proficiency in Report Making

Expert witnesses are almost always required to submit detailed reports about their findings. If an expert witness doesn't have excellent writing skills and adequate experience in creating reports, he will once more be subject to more abuse from the other party's legal counsel. Facts can easily be overturned if they are not stated convincingly. Ask for samples of your expert witness reports to visualize how he can help win your case.


September 26, 2008

Massachusetts Supreme Court Exludes Expert Witness Testimony in WalMart Case Part 2

The Massachusetts Supreme court ruled Wednesday against Walmart in a victory for some 67,500 current and former employees who claimed the retail giant withheld their wages and cut short their breaks The Boston Herald reports:

The Supreme Judicial Court vacated a 2006 trial court ruling that decertified the hourly employees’ class-action lawsuit, excluded testimony of their expert witness and granted partial summary judgment to Wal-Mart. The SJC said the judge “abused his discretion” because he “acted not on the basis of any challenge to (the expert’s) methodology, but essentially on his view that the records themselves were insufficiently reliable.”

September 25, 2008

Automobile Expert Witness On Stolen Vehicles Part 3

In The Current Problems and Solutions with Examinations on reported stolen Vehicles automobile expert witness Rob Painter writes that expert witnesses who do stolen vehicle examinations should have proper training, not only in locks, but burn debris analysis, security system analysis, steering column locking mechanism understanding, and in general how and why vehicles are stolen.

I recently received a phone call from a carrier in the Chicago area. He requested services
of a locksmith to determine if reported stolen vehicles were stolen. This in itself raised
concern for many reasons. The general locksmith without proper training should not be
involved with these vehicles especially when recovered burned. I have been to seminars
where locksmiths speak about theft. The problem is that they focus in on how they would
make a key to take the vehicle. It has been my experience to hear such speakers never
address how a thief would commonly defeat the column. The examiner needs to think
like a thief and not a general locksmith.

September 24, 2008

Massachusetts Supreme Court Exludes Expert Witness Testimony in WalMart Case

The Boston Herald reports:

The state’s highest court yesterday delivered a huge victory for some 67,500 current and former Massachusetts employees of Wal-Mart who claimed the retail giant systematically withheld their wages and cut short their breaks.

The Supreme Judicial Court vacated a 2006 trial court ruling that decertified the hourly employees’ class-action lawsuit, excluded testimony of their expert witness and granted partial summary judgment to Wal-Mart. The employees’ case, first filed in 2001, will now proceed in Middlesex Superior Court.

The employees’ lawsuit alleges that Wal-Mart illegally changed their timecards to reduce its reported payroll expenses, including clocking out workers one minute after they clocked in for work.

In excluding the testimony of their expert witness, the trial court judge said employees could not rely on Wal-Mart’s payroll records to prove their case without first showing that the records were overwhelmingly accurate.

September 23, 2008

Automobile Expert Witness On Stolen Vehicles Part 2

In The Current Problems and Solutions with Examinations on reported stolen Vehicles automobile expert witness Rob Painter writes that expert witnesses who do stolen vehicle examinations should have proper training, not only in locks, but burn debris analysis, security system analysis, steering column locking mechanism understanding, and in general how and why vehicles are stolen.

I recently was consulted on a case from out east where the examiner said the 2002 Nissan Altima could not be stolen because it had a transponder. This examiner is nuts to say that. This vehicle was a total strip and was towed. The transponder will not stop towing! In another case I was consulted on in Michigan, the “expert” actually put in his
report that the car was not towed! How did it get from the recovery site to where he
examined it?

September 22, 2008

Apparel Expert Witness & Flammable Fabrics

The apparel expert witness can opine on issues regarding garment manufacturing, clothing durability, and flammable fabrics. Phoenix.gov explains that:

All fabrics will burn but some are more combustible than others. Untreated natural fibers such as cotton, linen and silk burn more readily than wool, which is more difficult to ignite and burns with a low flame velocity.

The weight and weave of the fabric will affect how easily the material will ignite and burn. Recommended fabrics are materials with a tight weave - wool, modacrylic, 100 percent polyester and those that are flame-retardant treated. Heavy, tight weave fabrics will burn more slowly than loose weave, light fabrics of the same material. The surface texture of the fabric also affects flammability. Fabrics with long, loose, fluffy pile or "brushed" nap will ignite more readily than fabrics with a hard, tight surface, and in some cases will result in flames flashing across the fabric surface.

September 21, 2008

Automobile Expert Witness On Stolen Vehicles

In The Current Problems and Solutions with Examinations on reported stolen Vehicles automobile expert witness Rob Painter writes that expert witnesses who do stolen vehicle examinations should have proper training, not only in locks, but burn debris analysis, security system analysis, steering column locking mechanism understanding, and in general how and why vehicles are stolen.

There have been many times over the years that investigators asked me if I thought the insured committed fraud. In this case it does not matter what I think and that determination I am not qualified to do. I also cannot determine if a vehicle is stolen and neither can anyone else unless they were a party to the crime. All the examiner should be concerned about is how that vehicle last operated under its own power last.

September 20, 2008

Patents Expert Witness On Patent Reform Bill Part 2

The Senate version of the Patent Reform Act (S1145) was taken off the schedule in April 2008, meaning it will not be considered by the full Senate any time in the near future. Patents expert witness Daryl Martin's company website Consor writes:

Large IT companies and other technology companies are trying to reign in huge patent settlements ones like the $600 million plus award that NTP won from Research In Motion, the maker of the Blackberry wireless device, is a good example. Another example is the $1.5 billion award that Lucent briefly won from Gateway and Microsoft – currently under review.

While it appears that some of the Senate’s leadership is sympathetic for large technology companies, there is a small group of very high profile inventors and investors like the Segway designers and some of the Apple technology people, as well as venture capitalists, and a growing array of smaller businesses that do not share the market power of these larger companies. In addition, opposed to the patent reform act is the pharmaceutical industry, which has traditionally relied on the protection of a strong patent system.

September 19, 2008

Maritime Expert Witness On Reconstruction of Collision

Both Robert LaPointe and Terry Raye Trott apparently violated boating safety rules prior to a fatal boat crash on Long Lake, Maine, last summer, witnesses for the state testified at LaPointe's manslaughter trial Tuesday. Milford Daily News writes:

LaPointe, 39, of Medway, Mass., was going too fast at night and did not exercise care to avoid a collision when he came up on Trott's boat from behind, said Maine Warden Kevin Anderson and boat reconstruction expert William Chilcott.

Trott was in violation because his rear "all-around" light was not working, and he may not have had a sounding device on his motorboat, they said.But both witnesses agreed that under federal navigation rules, LaPointe was at fault for the Aug. 11, 2007, crash. His obligation as the boat coming up from behind superseded the obligation Trott had to maintain proper lighting, they said.

"Mr. LaPointe was driving too fast at night," said Anderson, who conducted a reconstruction of the collision using the salvaged boats. "He wasn't able to avoid the collision. He ran over a boat." Boaters on Maine's lakes are required to obey the navigation rules maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard, and any other state laws or local ordinances specific to each body of water.

Anderson said boaters must travel at speeds low enough to avoid a collision with another boat, a log, a loose dock, a swimmer or any other hazard that might present itself. Anderson estimated LaPointe was going between 40 and 50 mph at the time of the crash, and Trott was going between 10 and 20 mph.

September 18, 2008

Patents Expert Witness On Patent Reform Bill

The Senate version of the Patent Reform Act (S1145) was taken off the schedule in April 2008, meaning it will not be considered by the full Senate any time in the near future. Patents expert witness Daryl Martin's company website Consor writes:

The bill has been delayed because of the controversies surrounding specific provisions. Those are the provisions dealing with a limit on damages remedies in patent infringement, where the limit on damages would be established as the net contribution over and above the portion attributable to the prior art or other technology or patents contained in a product – in other words, instead of being able to award damages based on the total value of a product (an entire cell phone, for example), damages would be based only on the improvement or incremental contribution made by the specific patent being infringed.

September 17, 2008

Real Estate Expert Witness On Appraisal Review Part 2

n Appraisal Review in a Litigation Support Role real estate expert witness Jack P. Friedman, Ph.D., MAI, CPA, ASA, CRE, describes how the appraisal review process and review appraiser are used effectively in litigation support.

When engaged, or rather enmeshed, in litigation, an attorney will often solicit support from a review appraiser. Typical areas of assistance the attorney needs are:

3. To provide other forms of litigation support, such as preparing courtroom exhibits and
helping to frame questions to ask appraisal experts on both sides at depositions and during
trial testimony.

4. To advise the attorney about standards of practice, professional codes of ethics, sources of
information, other experts, and other matters that might impact the pleadings, discovery,
dismissals and pretrial judgments, settlement conference or other negotiations, and the actual
trial of the case.

September 16, 2008

Pensions Expert Witnesses Pitted Against Each Other

Cambridge Advisory Group, a financial consulting firm whose president has a murky CIA past, has earned more than $900,000 in consulting fees through Milwaukee County. Milwaukee County paid the pension adviser almost $1 million including at least $214,000 through the county’s law firm as a pensions expert witness in the county’s federal malpractice case against its former pension adviser, Mercer Inc. But after more than 2 1/2 years of work on the case, the firm’s president, Stuart S. Piltch, dropped out last month as one of the county’s key witnesses. JSOnline reports:

Mercer has been ratcheting up demands for details on Piltch’s actuarial training, efforts the county and Piltch have resisted. Though he’s not a licensed actuary, Piltch told county lawyers he received advanced training while working for the CIA and passed tests equivalent to those required for a professional license. In attacking Piltch’s credentials, Mercer appears to be aiming to discredit the county’s entire malpractice case. In one filing in the federal lawsuit, Mercer argues that a bogus expert could spoil the county’s case.

September 15, 2008

Real Estate Expert Witness On Appraisal Review

In Appraisal Review in a Litigation Support Role real estate expert witness Jack P. Friedman, Ph.D., MAI, CPA, ASA, CRE, describes how the appraisal review process and review appraiser are used effectively in litigation support.

When engaged, or rather enmeshed, in litigation, an attorney will often solicit support from a review appraiser. Typical areas of assistance the attorney needs are:

1. To review appraisal(s) prepared at the request of opposing counsel, identifying areas of
strength or weakness as an aid to the attorney in preparing the case, and to provide rebuttal testimony.

2. To review appraisal(s) prepared at the attorney’s request for the same purpose: to assist the attorney in preparing the case and to offer suggestions as to how the appraiser could make the report or presentation clearer or more effective to the fact finder.

September 14, 2008

Medical Expert Witness Testimony On Capitation

Medical expert witnesses are called to testify when patients file lawsuits against physicians or HMOs alleging that capitation played a causal factor in medical malpractice. In Physicians Win Lawsuits Over Inadequate PMPM Rates, Capitation Management Report describes two scenarios:

Non-referral to specialists:
Patients file lawsuits against physicians or HMOs because the primary care physician failed to refer, or to refer in a timely manner, the patient to a specialist. The reason for the non-referral generally cited in the lawsuit is that the doctor received a financial incentive to withhold care.

Inadequate capitation rates
Physicians file lawsuits against health plans because, they say, the low rates paid are intentionally trying to drive the doctors out of business, or that they breach their contracts in various ways.


September 13, 2008

Accident Reconstruction Expert Witnesses On Brake Failure

Expert witnesses from both sides agreed in testimony Thursday that Joseph E. Dodick’s failed brake system contributed to the crash that took the life of Michael Mikulin, 20, in Geneva, Ohio two years ago. Two accident reconstruction experts as well as a forensic engineering expert witness testified in the case.

Ashtabula County deputy engineer LeRoy McNeilly and Cuyahoga County coroner Dr. Frank Miller were also among witnesses called by attorneys. Dodick is charged with vehicular homicide.


September 12, 2008

The Home Inspection Expert Witness Report

The home inspection expert witness's report may cover the condition of the heating system, air conditioning system, plumbing, electrical systems, roof, attic,walls, ceilings, floors, windows, doors, the foundation, basement, and structural components.

The American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) recommends:

Do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection or in the selection of your home inspector. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest-priced inspection is not necessarily a bargain. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training, compliance with your state’s regulations, if any, and professional affiliations as a guide.

September 11, 2008

Construction Expert Witness On Guaranteed Maximum Contracts Part 2

In Guaranteed Maximum Contracts construction expert witness Paul Gogulski explains the the G-Max contract:

How do they work? In the following example, the best bid price received from a qualified general contractor for a major renovation is $2.5 million. The owner's budget is $2.2 million, but modifications and changes are anticipated for an additional $500,000 estimated construction costs. Time is of the essence. The project must start immediately. The owner wishes to cut $300,000 from the base contract without changing the scope of work and at the same time control cost of the additions without giving away the $500,000. The contractor already dropped his price on the first round of negotiations and won't budge off his $2.5 million. This project is an ideal candidate for G-Max conversion.

September 10, 2008

Agricultural Expert Witness On Forensic Agronomy - Part 3

Certified Professional Agronomist Dale Softley serves as an agricultural expert witness in agricultural fraud cases. He writes:

Many agronomists use GPS and GIS technology when possible to increase the precession of their work. Placing a GPS in one’s pocket produces an exact map of where in the field the person had traveled, and can note specific points on a computerized map for future
reference or application. As part of our practice I normally use a GPS when making aerial
observations of fields or locations. The use of aerial observations and photography of a subject site often provides new or different insights of a specific problem not readily apparent from ground observations.

When working loss problems an Agronomist may use a variety of sources, from
government's documents, public records, and personal knowledge, to solve a given
problem.

September 9, 2008

Construction Expert Witness On Guaranteed Maximum Contracts

In Guaranteed Maximum Contracts construction expert witness Paul Gogulski explains the the G-Max contract:

Guaranteed Maximum Contracts or G-Max are becoming more popular as a corporate vehicle to control cost and integrate the diverse interests of a complex project. Not to be confused with cost plus, the G-Max contract is bid exactly the same as lump sum. The contractor assumes the same risk, with a big stipulation: he's willing to share in the savings on the basis of the owner's guarantee of fee and prompt payment of net cost.

There's no difference in cost or risk between Lump Sum and Guaranteed Max, but a big difference in results, particularly on the owner's side of the fence. Don't let anyone tell you that G-Max cost more. They don't! In fact, Lump Sum contracts are sometimes converted to G-Max for the same price or less.


More to come from Gogulski & Associates Inc.

September 8, 2008

Agricultural Expert Witness On Forensic Agronomy - Part 2

Certified Professional Agronomist Dale Softley serves as an agricultural expert witness in agricultural fraud cases. He describes his forensic agronomist job as being "like 'CSI', but for plants." The Softleys test soil, stems, or anything they can find to solve problems that include why crops are not growing, how plants became diseased or any other conditions farmers and their insurance companies want explained. Softley states:

Forensic agronomy normally is used to investigate issues over damage to crop or soil by
a second or third party, such as chemical drift, livestock invasion, range fires, water
drainage obstructions, and a host of other events.

Production problems pertaining to the loss of yield, including hail are covered by specific
policies, and are adjusted by specialized personal. Once in a while someone can slip
things past these adjusters and they need some expertise to help solve problems.

A forensic agronomist knows where to start looking for short cuts producers may have
taken, producing a yield subject to federal crop insurance payment. These cases may
include the use of improper seed sources, withholding adequate inputs such as fertility,
herbicides, insecticides or irrigation water.

September 7, 2008

Pollution Expert Witness On Mold - Part 3

In Mold Claims: Recognizing What Is Real and Dealing With the Current Excessive Fears and Claims, pollution expert witness Ronald E. Gots, MD, Ph.D.writes:

RISK DECISION PROCESS

As noted in the introduction, true health risks are generally minimal in most mold contamination situations. Exceptions may rarely exist, i.e., if contamination is extensive,
if occupants are highly allergic, if residents are immunocompromised (generally limited to patients on chemotherapy for cancer and organ transplant treatment). However, although health is the driver for most testing and remediation; we must recognize that perceived health risks are the real driver. Because of the extensive publicity people are genuinely worried about mold. That, plus legal representation, now common, are key determinants of your actions. This is particularly true in high-risk jurisdictions like California, Florida and Texas, although no area is immune. These factors have led to the need for prompt action and decisions. Some of those must be guided by the level of distress of involved parties. This presents the claims handler a new challenge: psychological assessment and early clinical assessment of the client or occupants. This, in turn, must be considered before denying coverage or permitting the claimant to move. One approach we have used in homeowners matters is requiring a physical
examination of residents who complain of symptoms. After all, the IAQ people are not qualified to connect symptoms to cause. If the occupant believes that his/her health has been compromised, then what could be more reasonable and supportable than medical
confirmation? One caution: use standard, mainstream physicians, not those who are making a current career in mold hype or fear (a minute fraction, by the way, of the medical community).

September 6, 2008

Agricultural Expert Witness On Forensic Agronomy

Certified Professional Agronomist Dale Softley serves as an agricultural expert witness in agricultural fraud cases. In Forensic Agronomy, a new tool to solve old problems, Softley describes forensic agronomy:

Forensic agronomy is the using of agronomic procedures to measure and verify
facts pertaining to agricultural claims or losses. Once facts have been quantified and
documented there is reduced room for argument, and the emotion of that issue is
minimized for the case.

Agronomy is the general study or science of crop production that includes a large number
of subtopics such as: genetics, fertility, soil, chemicals, range and grassland management,
as well as production practices and procedures.

In my opinion fraud includes everything from misrepresentation of a loss by falsifying
the value, amount, or quality of an alleged damage, to misappropriation of funds for
coverage or loss.

September 5, 2008

Pollution Expert Witness On Mold - Part 2

In Mold Claims: Recognizing What Is Real and Dealing With the Current Excessive Fears and Claims, pollution expert witness Ronald E. Gots, MD, Ph.D.writes:

Outdoor levels of mold spores in parts of the country (i.e., St. Louis in summer) are routinely 50,000 m3.5 People are being told to evacuate homes which have 5% of those levels. The term “toxic” mold makes no sense.6 Almost all molds can make mycotoxins including Alternaria, one of the most common outdoor molds and always considered “non-toxic” or benign by environmental consultants. One of the reasons for this strange and vast discord between health realities and health perceptions is the lack of medical expert voices in the fray. Instead, the din of “indoor air” experts and “air quality experts,” few of whom have any medical expertise and even fewer of whom have read thoroughly the scientific literature, has coopted this field. Some fringe physicians have also jumped into this arena. The growing interest in testing and finding problems rivals Anderson’s interest in keeping Enron healthy. Thus, they are neither expert, nor impartial.

September 4, 2008

Wood Expert Witness On Collapsed School Roof

When the new junior high in Waterford Maine opened for the first time, a teacher observed that the ceiling was deflected and that dust was coming from the ceiling. The school was evacuated and a short time later the roof to collapsed. Wood products expert witness Rubin M. Zallen, P.E., determined that drifting snow increased the snow load and caused the collapse. In his report, Zallen offered these definitions:

The allowable load is also called the safe load; it is the ultimate load divided by an appropriate safety factor. The ultimate load itself may be a collapse load or may be a yield load beyond which excessive deflections would render the member unusable.

Dead load is the weight of the building components.

September 3, 2008

Pollution Expert Witness On Mold

In Mold Claims: Recognizing What Is Real and Dealing With the Current Excessive Fears and Claims, pollution expert witness Ronald E. Gots, MD, Ph.D.writes:

The recent mold frenzy is the strangest environmental claims issue that I have seen in thirty years of toxicological and environmental litigation consulting. Why? Mold is a natural living material and is essential for life. It has neither become more prevalent than it was twenty years ago; nor is there much additional support for any new adverse health effects despite thousands of active claims alleging the contrary. Most of the allegations in this arena are based upon substantial misinformation, so often repeated that they have garnered an aura of certitude. Among the misinformation: mold and mold toxins in the indoor environment are not known to cause brain damage,1 immunological disorders, bleeding lungs in newborns,2,3 fibromyalgia, attention deficit disorder, cancer or chronic fatigue syndrome. The alleged chronic disorder of “fungal syndrome”4 or “bioaerosal disease” are neither accepted in the medical community, nor known to exist.

September 2, 2008

Equipment Expert Witnesses Testimony

Lawyers must be sure that their expert witnesses testify in a way the jury understands clearly. It is often easy for legal counsel to understand testimony because he or she is familiar with it but they must remember that this is the first time jurors have heard it. For example, the equipment and machinery expert witness must be able to testify on the facts, concepts, and technical language in an understandable way on subjects that may include woodworking machinery (radial blades, bandsaws, debarkers, conveyors, lumber stackers, resaws, planers, etc.) and metalworking machinery (cutoff saws, lathes, grinders, sand blasters, punch presses, tipping machines, drills, etc.)

September 1, 2008

Spousal Abuse Expert Witness Testifies In Police Chief Case

Former Blue Lake, CA, police chief David Gundersen faces two dozen counts of raping his wife Darcie Seal with the use of an intoxicant, as well as charges of violating a court order, attempting to dissuade the victim of a crime, and illegally possessing a submachine gun and a pistol with a silencer attached. Gundersen's wife feared the would kill her if she testified against him, a District Attorney's Office investigator and a friend of Gundersen's wife testified Thursday. Spousal abuse expert witness Diane Wetendorf testified that while domestic violence can take all shapes and forms, it is always about power and control. The TimesStandard reports:

Abusers, Wetendorf testified, often use isolation, emotional abuse, economic abuse and sexual abuse to exert constant control over their partners.

Because of these factors, as well as pressures from family and religion, Wetendorf said it is very common for it to take years for a victim to come forward. And when they eventually do, Wetendorf said, it is very common for them to later recant their statements.

Wetendorf said she's seen women get emergency protective orders against their violent husbands only to recant their allegations to get their husbands off the hook when the matter comes before a court.