May 31, 2008

Using Industrial Hygiene Expert Witnesses

Since jurors sometimes give more weight to expert witness testimony than to lay opinions or closing arguments, finding topics in your case that are sufficiently beyond common experience will permit expert testimony. You may need to be imaginative in coming up with ideas for expert testimony. For example, industrial hygiene expert witnesses can be used in many ways. They are prepared to opine and write reorts on chemical hygiene plans, environmental management systems, industrial accident reconstruction, industrial chemicals, industrial chemical toxicology, industrial cleaning, industrial exhaust systems, industrial hygiene engineering, and industrial toxicology, among other topics. If your expert is not allowed to testify, be prepared with other testimony or evidence. It may also be possible to include the information in your closing argument.

May 30, 2008

Plastics Expert Witness On CD & DVD Coatings

Plastics expert witness Dr. George Pasternack has this to say on coatings for web form plastic films:

The rapid cure speed of UV curable coatings has enabled manufacturers of CDs and DVDs to maximize manufacturing line speed (~ 3 to 4 seconds per unit). Two different types of UV materials are used in the manufacture of CDs. First, a UV abrasion resistant clear coat is spin coated onto the metal reflective layer. The protected metallized surface is then screen printed with a UV curable ink. In the case of DVDs, a UV curable adhesive is used to bind the protective polycarbonate layer to the metallized polycarbonate layer. The viscosity of the CD clear coat varies between 10 to 100 cps at 25o C, and the viscosity of DVD adhesives is less than 1,000 cps at 25o C.

For more see http://mysite.verizon.net/mb.pasternack/

May 29, 2008

Paints and Coatings Expert Witness On UV/EB Curable Coatings

Dr. George Pasternack, paints and coatings expert witness, writes this on safe handling of UV/EB curable coatings:

Acrylates are considered to be skin irritants and skin sensitizers. Therefore, as with any other liquid chemical, it is important to prevent skin and eye contact when handling UV/EB curable coatings. Wearing chemical resistant gloves, safety glasses or goggles, and a work uniform or protective apron are required to safely handle UV/EB curable coatings. Clothing soiled with acrylates should be removed immediately to prevent skin contact. Washing hands routinely with lukewarm water and a mild soap is also advisable to remove any undetected acrylate that may have come with the skin. Depending upon the situation, wearing a plastic bootie over shoes may be advisable. The skin and eye irritation and sensitization hazards are eliminated once the coating is fully cured. Instructing employees in the safe handling of UV/EB curable coatings should be part of an employee-training program.

May 28, 2008

Aviation Expert Witness Areas of Expertise

When hiring an aviation expert witness, look for one who can provide litigation and legal support in the domain that fits your case's fact pattern. AeroPacific Consulting breaks down general aviation into the areas of :

Aerobatics
Accident investigation and reconstruction
Aeronautical judgment and decision-making
Aircraft loss of control
Aircraft system-subsystem/failure analysis
Airline operations
Airline safety management
Airline transport pilot
Airmanship
Airworthiness
ATC procedures
Cockpit automation
Commercial flight operations
CVR/FDR interpretation and analysis
Controlled flight into terrain (CFIT)
Evaluation of deposition and documentation analysis
Expert testimony
FAA regulations
Failure analysis
Flight dynamics/aerodynamics
Human factors
Legal research
Litigation support
Medical qualification and certificates
NTSB report analysis
Pilot error
Pilot/crew performance
Pilot/crew "standard of care"
Pilot hiring practices and employment issues
Pilot salary review and estimation
Pilot/crew training
Product liability
Research and case preparation analysis
Terrain collision and avoidance system (TCAS)
Weather/meteorological factors
Witness interviews

May 27, 2008

Handwriting Expert Witness On Suspicious Docs Part 3

In Checklist of Suspicious Features, Jacqueline A. Joseph, Certified Document Examiner and handwriting expert witness writes:

If you have a suspicious document or handwriting or typewriting, these clues should alert you to the need for a document examiner:

Only copies are available, and they are of unusually poor quality.

The handwriting appears to be of multiple styles or of a style the alleged maker may not have used, such as printscript by an American educated before 1940.

The handwriting has the same pressure throughout or has blunt beginnings and endings. This may indicate the writing was deliberately drawn to imitate a model.

For more, see http://www.jjhandwriting.com/

May 26, 2008

Gangs Expert Witness On Beating Death of Surfer

A gangs defense expert says that five young men charged with murder and gang allegations in the beating death of a surfer outside his La Jolla home do not fit the legal definition of being members of a criminal street gang. San Diego News reports:

Alfonso Valdez, a University of California, Irvine sociology professor who teaches classes on gang cultures, testified in the preliminary hearing for Seth Cravens, Orlando Osuna, Matthew Yanke, Eric House and Hank Hendricks, who are accused in the death a year ago of 24-year-old Emery Kauanui. "It is not a gang," the expert witness testified. "None of the defendants in this case are gang members as defined under California law." Valdez said none of the defendants admitted gang membership and did not act like gang members.

May 25, 2008

Handwriting Expert Witness On Suspicious Documents - Part 2

In Checklist of Suspicious Features, Jacqueline A. Joseph, Certified Document Examiner and handwriting expert witness writes:

If you have a suspicious document or handwriting or typewriting, these clues should alert you to the need for a document examiner:

The paper, ink, mode of production or other feature of the document may not have existed at the time the document purports to have been executed or may not have been available in the place where the document originated. An example of that last point would be a computer-generated and printed document from a place where computers were not available until more recently.

Relative to the above item, check the origin and date of production on commercially printed forms. They may be incongruent with the purported date and place of the document. (A real case involved a “1975” legal document on a form printed in 1983!)

Corrections and erasures seem to be present. Some of these can only be detected by close scrutiny with laboratory equipment.


For more, see http://www.jjhandwriting.com/

May 24, 2008

Rules For Working With Economics Expert Witnesses - Part 6

In 14 Rules For Working With An Expert Economist, expert witness Dr. Jerome M. Staller offers "rules" to follow that will help your economics expert witness do the best job he or she can for you and your client.

Never ask your expert to go beyond the scope of his or her expertise. I see this more often then I should: economists offering opinions that only a medical or vocational expert is qualified to provide, fore example. Why risk impeachment? In many cases the only way to build a defensible and credible damages argument is by assembling a team of experts -- vocational, medical and economic. Your economist can tell you what the limits of economic expertise is in the particular case, and whether he or she will need opinions from other types of experts.

Never make your expert your advocate. Instead, have your expert zealously advocate his or her opinion.


Excerpted from The Center for Forensic Economic Studies http://www.cfes.com/

May 23, 2008

Aviation Expert Witnesses & "Open Skies" Part 2

Zoltan Kazatsay from the European Commission's Directorate for Energy and Transport had this to say regarding "Open Skies":
"The European Union has one clear political goal, we want to establish an open aviation area between the United States of America and the European Union. But how to reach this specific situation and when to reach it is another issue." The.U.S. has said it would seek to remove access restrictions on airlines from more than 60 nations. Kazatsay said, however, that the EU would "like to concentrate on the deepening of the existing agreement. We think that a broader multilateral initiative cannot replace the bilateral removal of this type of restrictions."

Aviation expert witnesses will no doubt be called to testify before Congress regarding “Open Skies” between the United States and European Union.


May 22, 2008

Rules For Working With Economics Expert Witnesses - Part 4

In 14 Rules For Working With An Expert Economist, expert witness Dr. Jerome M. Staller offers "rules" to follow that will help your economics expert witness do the best job he or she can for you and your client.

Never cross examine the opposing expert in deposition. Instead, inquire and learn. A deposition should not a warm-up for trial: You want to learn as much as possible and not tip your hand. Aggressive questioning during depositions is almost always counterproductive

Never hide information from your expert. Chances are, whatever facts you withhold from your expert will be known to the opposing side, which could lead to devastating cross.


Excerpted from The Center for Forensic Economic Studies http://www.cfes.com/

May 21, 2008

Handwriting Expert Witness On Suspicious Documents

In Checklist of Suspicious Features, Jacqueline A. Joseph, Certified Document Examiner and handwriting expert witness writes:

If you have a suspicious document or handwriting or typewriting, these clues should alert you to the need for a document examiner:

No one knows the document’s origin or the history of its custody.

The text of the document seems to anticipate and answer objections that will be raised against it, especially peculiar ones.

The materials or the literary form of the document are not what you would usually expect in such cases. For example, a will purports to be a formal one drawn up by an attorney, but the paper is ordinary bond. Another example would be a will that uses archaic terminology that contemporary attorneys no longer employ.

For more, see http://www.jjhandwriting.com/

May 20, 2008

Aviation Expert Witnesses & "Open Skies"

Aviation expert witnesses will no doubt be called to testify before Congress regarding “Open Skies” between the United States and European Union.

C. Boyden Gray, the U.S. envoy to the European Commission, said that a lot of work would need to be put into persuading the U.S. Congress not to block the deal amid fears of possible takeovers of U.S. airlines.

"It's going to take a lot of work to persuade our congress that this is something that should be allowed, I don't think it's impossible to do at all but it will take generating public support in the United States and that is do-able but is not easy," Gray said.


For more see http://www.reuters.com/

May 19, 2008

Rules For Working With Economics Expert Witnesses - Part 3

In 14 Rules For Working With An Expert Economist, expert witness Dr. Jerome M. Staller offers "rules" to follow that will help your economics expert witness do the best job he or she can for you and your client.

Use your expert to assemble, review and analyze data. Your expert will help you martial your facts and use them to compose an effective narrative. Use your economist to help guide depositions and discovery -- he knows best what you will need to build a credible narrative as far as economic issues.

Develop the theme of the damages case with the expert. A damages argument is the story of differences: what was the plaintiff's economic status before the incident, and what was the plaintiff's economic status after the incident? The jury can best understand these differences if they are presented as a narrative. Your economist can help you frame the theme of this narrative and can supply facts and theories enabling the jury to understand and accept the narrative..


Excerpted from The Center for Forensic Economic Studies http://www.cfes.com/

May 18, 2008

Construction Expert Witness on Common Construction Defects - Part 2

In Common Construction Defects, expert witness Pete Fowler describes how substandard construction during Southern California's 1980s building boom has created a construction defect litigation “industry.” He writes:

Attorneys, acting as advocates for homeowners, hire these experts in the effort to prove that shoddy workmanship is causing new homes to rapidly deteriorate. Meanwhile, the home building industry, put on the defensive, is claiming that the real problem is unscrupulous attorneys who are feeding off the media coverage and exploiting the legal system. The reality is probably somewhere in between. Regardless, residential construction in Southern California has never been so thoroughly scrutinized.

As a construction expert witness, Fowler provides "a guided tour through some of the most common errors and omissions fueling the litigation frenzy in the California building industry."
For more see http://www.petefowler.com/index.html

May 17, 2008

Rules For Working With Economics Expert Witnesses - Part 2

In 14 Rules For Working With An Expert Economist, expert witness Dr. Jerome M. Staller offers "rules" to follow that will help your economics expert witness do the best job he or she can for you and your client.

Engage in specific discovery for each damages claim. Claims for economic damages can involve several elements: lost income, lost household services, lost fringe benefits, different elements of survival and wrongful death claims. Your economist requires specific data relevant to each of these elements. Help your economist by discovering facts relevant to each element of damages.

Think through the logic of each separate aspect of the claim. What aspects of the plaintiff's particular situation may affect the economic damages argument? Is the industry the plaintiff works in affected by any special economic factors that may not be obvious? Was a self-employed plaintiff's income the result of the disabled plaintiff's labor, or was it return on investment? Would a preexisting health condition have limited the plaintiff's ability to earn income, regardless of the injury at issue? Is it reasonable to argue that a disabled construction worker could become a computer specialist?


Excerpted from The Center for Forensic Economic Studies http://www.cfes.com/

May 16, 2008

Police Procedures Expert Witnesses In Sean Bell Hearing

Eyewitness News reporter Nina Pineda reports on the NYPD's aggressive policing tactics:

Excessive police force, racial profiling and the independence of local prosecutors are the three issues the House Judiciary Committee is examining to determine how to proceed on a federal level with the legacy of Sean Bell. "This committee, this delegation, will insist that the Justice Department pursue a comprehensive, fair and expeditious investigation of this case," New York Congressman Jerrold Nadler said.

The committee is going to review the recommendations from police procedures expert witnesses on federal oversight of police patterns and practices, not just in New York City, but in any city where public confidence in law enforcement is questioned.

May 15, 2008

Construction Expert Witness on Common Construction Defects

In Common Construction Defects, expert witness Pete Fowler describes how substandard construction during Southern California's 1980s building boom has created a construction defect litigation “industry.” As a construction expert witness, Fowler commonly sees problems with diaphragms and shear walls. He writes:

Failure to follow the nailing requirements for shear walls and diaphragms is a common defect. Many builders temporarily set the plywood in place with a few hand-driven nails, then return later to finish the nailing with a gun. Unfortunately, we sometimes find that the second step in the process has been forgotten and the finish materials are installed over inadequately attached plywood. Another typical mistake is the substitution of box nails or sinkers for the specified common nails, or use of a smaller size nail.

For more see
http://www.petefowler.com/index.html

May 14, 2008

Aviation Expert Witness's Aviation Accident Analysis Text ™

Aviation expert witness Captain "J" Joseph is a full time airline pilot and Colonel in the United States Marine Corps Reserve. When hiring an aviation expert witness, Joseph recommends working with one who will pull together FAA and NTSB factual reports, interviews conducted with personnel (including witnesses and flight crews), technical support personnel interviews, and industry technical publications. His Aviation Accident Analysis Text ™ includes:

HISTORY OF FLIGHT
Provides a chronological breakdown of the mishap. All phases of the flight, from pre-flight through the actual mishap, are defined.

AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS
Explores the technical aspects of aircraft systems and components through all pertinent phases of the flight. A detailed examination and correlation is made between system failures and how they relate to the mishap.

PILOT PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS
This portion of the text defines those critical areas of human interaction and how they relate to the accident.

CAUSAL FACTORS
Outlines all possible contributory factors. Suggested factors are refuted or substantiated, predicated upon pertinent facts or other logical information.

PROBABLE CAUSE
Details those factors which led to and define the actual cause of the mishap. This section of the text will often refute or redefine previous FAA or NTSB findings.

For more, see

http://www.josephaviationconsulting.com/Jacprof.html

May 13, 2008

Computers Expert Witness on Computer Forensic Analysis - Part 2

Computers expert witness Scott Greene of Great Scott Enterprises, Inc., writes that it is important to understand that computer forensics is not just "looking around in a computer."

There are very specific protocols for recovering, preserving and analyzing the data as evidence. Certain data may need to be recovered due to the fact that it was purposely destroyed. In addition, there are data files that are created during normal operation of the operating system or of an application program that individuals usually don't realize exist. These intricacies require an expert. Proper handling techniques preserves data from websites, computer files, fax machines, emails, etc.

Did you know that:
Some fax machines can contain exact duplicates of the last several hundred pages received?
Faxes sent or received via computer may remain indefinitely on the computer?

People tend to write things in email that they would never consider writing in a memorandum or letter?
Email has been used successfully in criminal cases as well as civil litigation.
Email is often backed up on tapes that are generally kept for months or years?

Excerpted from http://great-scott.com/index.html

May 12, 2008

Electrical Engineer Expert Witness On Tasers

The risk of injury or death from the use of Tasers is low, an expert witness has testified at a public inquiry ordered after the death of Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski. J. Patrick Reilly, an electrical engineer expert witness, said yesterday the weapon is safe compared with a handgun. The Star.com reports:

"Safety is relative. You can hurt people with batons and even pepper spray," said Reilly, a research scientist at Johns Hopkins University. "I wouldn't want to be Tasered myself but I recognize among the arsenal of things, this may be a useful tool."

Reilly has been offered funding money from stun-gun manufacturers and Taser International, the Arizona-based company that produces the weapon, but has declined financial grants from such companies.

He receives money from the U.S. Department of Justice, which is looking at ways to use non-lethal weapons. He has also testified at two coroners' inquests in the Vancouver area following the deaths of two men shot with Tasers in separate incidents.

May 11, 2008

Rules For Working With Economics Expert Witnesses

In 14 Rules For Working With An Expert Economist, expert witness Dr. Jerome M. Staller offers "rules" to follow that will help your economics expert witness do the best job he or she can for you and your client.

Retain experts early enough to assist with discovery. This should be a no-brainer, yet I still get calls asking if I can testify in a case that is being tried next week. To produce a credible, defensible and thorough damages argument, I need specific and detailed data, much of which can only be obtained through discovery. This takes time.

Work to understand relevant technical issues. The best attorneys I have worked with share one significant trait: they have an avid curiosity about the details of all phases of each case -- liability, damages and everything else, and work to understand all relevant technical aspects of a claim.

Excerpted from The Center for Forensic Economic Studies http://www.cfes.com/

May 10, 2008

Securities Expert Witness On FPA v. SEC

Securities expert witness Chris McConnell, AIFA®, writes on a 2007 court decision requiring some stock brokers to register and comply with the Investment Advisors Act of 1940.

Prior to this decision (FPA v. SEC) what was the brokers' responsibility to customers' accounts? Over 1 million customers may find new customer account agreements in the mail. Customers should read and understand potential liability-shifting and the gravity of the decision on previous, current and future investment advice and recommendations. Some customers especially trustees, unwittingly relinquish rights even before investments occur; fiduciary duty appllies before and during review and monitoring of the account agreement with the broker dealer or investment adviser and any changes thereto. Notably, stock brokers (Series 7 licensees, registered representatives, supervised by broker dealers) are required to adhere to FINRA (formerly NASD) rule 2310 regarding Suitability and the NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) rule 405 regarding “Know (and update) your Customer” as they relate to securities recommendations in contrast to the customer's cash flow needs, time horizon, age, tax bracket, tolerance for risk (fluctuation to principal), income (amounts and sources), net worth (liquid and total) and other factors.

Excerpted from http://www.fiduciaryexpert.com/page2.html

May 9, 2008

Computers Expert Witness on Computer Forensic Analysis

Computers expert witness Scott Greene of Great Scott Enterprises, Inc., writes that it is important to understand that computer forensics is not just "looking around in a computer."

There are very specific protocols for recovering, preserving and analyzing the data as evidence. Certain data may need to be recovered due to the fact that it was purposely destroyed. In addition, there are data files that are created during normal operation of the operating system or of an application program that individuals usually don't realize exist. These intricacies require an expert. Proper handling techniques preserves data from websites, computer files, fax machines, emails, etc.

Did you know that computer forensic analysis can reveal:

What web sites have been visited?
What files were been downloaded?
File creation, access and modification dates?
Attempts to conceal and destroy evidence or data?
Data fabricate attempts?
Original electronic documents can contain text that were removed from the printed version?


Excerpted from http://great-scott.com/index.html

May 8, 2008

Expert Witness Retention Agreement Available Through SEAK

SEAK Inc. has developed a very comprehensive expert witness retention agreement. The contract addresses many issues, including:

• Being kept in the dark by retaining counsel
• Being purposefully conflicted out of the case
• Being stuck in a case with a problematic attorney
• Collection of fees
• Conflicts of interest
• Credibility challenges
• Deposition fees reduced via protective order
• Document retention
• Duties toward successor law firms
• Expense reimbursement
• Incomplete documentation
• Lack of preparation by retaining counsel prior to testimony
• Last minute testimony cancellations
• Late payment of fees
• Less than ethical attorneys
• Licensing issues when testifying out of state
• Non-payment of fees
• Preserving the expert’s reputation
• Pushed outside your true area of expertise
• Refusal to pay for all time spent on case
• Scheduling
• Storage costs
• Subpoenas
• Travel conditions
• Undisclosed Daubert challenges
• Unreasonable budgets
• Unreasonable deadlines
• Unreviewed answers to interrogatories

This contract is well worth the $100 amount, and can be purchased by clicking here: Expert Witness Retention Agreement.

May 7, 2008

JurisPro's President to Speak at SEAK's National Expert Witness Conference

JurisPro's President Jim Robinson, Esq. will be one of the keynote presenters at SEAK, Inc.’s upcoming 17th Annual National Expert Witness Conference on Cape Cod June 19-20, 2008. Mr. Robinson's topic will be “How Lawyers Dig up Dirt on Expert Witnesses.”

SEAK’s conference is very highly regarded and features superb, practical information presented by judges, attorneys, experts and trial consultants.

Continuing education credit is available for accident reconstructionists, arborists, attorneys, accountants, appraisers, engineers, life care planners, nurses, physicians, and psychologists.

Please click here for more information, and to register for the conference: SEAK Conference Registration.

May 6, 2008

Bankruptcy Expert Witness On Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act

In Preference Defense: New Challenges Facing Creditors bankruptcy expert witness Dorman Wood writes:

At its inception, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (BAPCPA) was hailed as the most sweeping revision of the bankruptcy law in more than two decades.

While the majority of the revisions under BPACPA were aimed at individual bankruptcy reform, several touched on commercial bankruptcy reform.

One such revision was to §547(c)(2), which is commonly referred to as a creditor’s ‘ordinary course of business defense’ to a preference suit brought by a trustee, unsecured trade creditors committee or in some cases, a plan administrator. A creditor’s ordinary course of business defense’ pre-BAPCPA was required to meet a three-prong test to show that a payment received within the 90-day period prior to (and including) the bankruptcy petition date, was: 1) made upon a debt incurred by the debtor in the ordinary course of business or financial affairs of the debtor and transferee, 2) made in the ordinary course of business or financial affairs of the parties, and 3) made according to ordinary business terms. Prongs 1 and 2 were referred to as the “subjective test” of the parties’ dealings. Prong 3 was referred to as the “objective test” of the standards observed in the relevant industry.


Dorman Wood is Managing Member, DORMAN WOOD Associates, LLC www.Witness4U.com

May 5, 2008

Banking Expert Witness On Personal Emergency Preparedness

In Personal Emergency Preparedness: How Prepared Are You? banking expert witness Catherine Ghiglieri writes that since 9/11 the banking industry has focused on emergency preparedness in dealing with potential terrorist threats or natural disasters. Very few have stopped to consider their personal emergency preparedness. Ghiglieri suggests putting:

All important documents or copies of them, in a binder that can be easily taken out of the home in case of a quick evacuation. Our binders are bright red, clearly marked with “Emergency Binder,” and are placed in an easily accessible location, such as a bookcase or closet near the door. In the event of an impending hurricane, these binders can easily be placed in a large zip-lock bag to assure water-tightness if an evacuation is mandated or the roof leaks. A selection of baby and marriage pictures or anything else that is precious should also be assembled and located with the emergency binders.

More to come from Catherine Ghiglieri, former Texas Banking Commissioner and President of Ghiglieri & Company, a bank consulting firm www.ghiglieri.com.

May 4, 2008

When Is A Gems & Jewelry Expert Witness Needed?

Appraiser Vickie Adams tells us when a gems & jewelry expert witness is needed and describes the process:

Marriage or business dissolution looks to an appraisal for equitable division.
Civil and criminal litigation requires an independent appraisal to report the dollar value of damage.
Appraisals may support litigation, help resolve disputes, estimate loss when damage occurs, and explain the value of a property in exchange. Property seizure, probate, and estate planning are other reasons for an appraisal.
Through research, the appraisal process generally develops in three stages:

First, identification of the property

1. Interpretation of the hallmarks, trademarks, backstamps and signatures
2. Recording of the metal fineness marks, model numbers and serial numbers
3. Identification of materials, construction techniques and craftsmanship

Next, evaluation of the property

1. Observation and/or tested using instruments
2. Notation of measurements, weights, quality and condition
3. Consideration of style, aesthetic appeal and form

Finally, valuation of the property

1. Research sales in the marketplace
2. Adjustment of sales data for dissimilarities to the item appraised
3. Form an opinion of value from the adjusted comparable sales


For more see http://www.adamsappraisers.com/

May 3, 2008

Hiring An Antiques, Art, & Collectibles Appraisal Expert Witness

Antiques, art, & collectibles appraisal expert witnesses are knowledgeable regarding property types and their relevant markets. These expert witnesses have prepared themselves to identify and value personal property. When hiring such an expert, look for one with the special knowledge, skill, experience, training, and education in valuation. They will be able to provide reports and expert testimony on art valuation, antique furniture, coins, metalware, sports collectibles and more.

May 2, 2008

JurisPro to Publish Videos of Expert Witnesses

Legal professionals who visit the JurisPro Expert Witness Directory will soon be able to view video clips of expert witnesses. Attorneys have asked to have video clips of our clients, and JurisPro will be providing them to legal professionals through its Web site. This is another way that JurisPro is clearly conveying the qualifications of its clients.

If you are a JurisPro client, the easiest way to have your video clip made known to legal professionals through JurisPro is to upload the clip to Google video. Once you have uploaded it, then email the link to info@jurispro.com. JurisPro will then link your video with your profile.

Alternatively, you may send a copy of the video clip on a DVD to:

JurisPro, Inc.
Attention: Member Services
703 Pier Ave., Ste. B213
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

The video clip should be no more than 5 minutes in length. It is suggested that the video be a short description of your services, an excerpt from a video deposition, or a news clip.

If you have questions, please contact Karen Olson at 888-818-9444 or email her at Karen@JurisPro.com.

May 1, 2008

JurisPro's Clients Now Accessible through the #5 Law Firm in the U.S.

Clients who have listed their qualifications as an expert witness with the JurisPro Expert Witness Directory are now accessible through Sidley & Austin, the #5 law firm in the United States as ranked by AMLaw.

"Through JurisPro Law Librarian Karen Olson's efforts, JurisPro's clients are now at the fingertips of tens of thousands of attorneys who practice at some of the most prestigious law firms in the United States," said attorney Jim Robinson of JurisPro. "JurisPro's clients can now be directly contacted through the internal network of 12 of the top 20 law firms in the United States, and 35 of the top 100."

Sidley Austin diversified global practice encompasses the spectrum of corporate, transactional, litigation and regulatory matters. Their practice areas include: litigation, business, healthcare, intellectual property, real estate, products liability, labor and environmental, to name just a few.